Global Citizenship Framework

Global citizenship is the idea that people have rights and responsibilities that come with being a citizen of the entire world, rather than a particular nation or place.

As a culture, we tend to organize ourselves into groups and communities which share common values, ideas, and identity. While this makes for easy, comfortable connections, it also tends to narrow one’s vision of the world, presupposing what is right and fair, and how things should be.

To move beyond the local, Participate Learning has developed a global citizenship framework so that educators can develop the next generation of global citizens.

 

Building global citizens

When teachers apply a global lens to their instructional practices, they are building global competencies in their students, thereby nurturing global citizens. Global citizens are proactive in their efforts to make the world a better place.

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Global Citizenship Framework

 

The global citizenship framework

Our framework outlines how global citizenship can be developed in the classroom: by applying a global lens to every-day instructional practices, teachers cultivate global competencies in their students and create global citizens.

Learn more about each component of the global citizenship framework and find additional resources below.

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Instructional practices | Global Lens | Global competencies

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Instructional Practices framework


Instructional practices

While not unique to global classrooms, these instructional practices are necessary to developing students’ global competencies and are aligned to recognized best practices and teaching standards..

These are the instructional practices that are key to the Participate Learning global citizenship framework:

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Give students agency | Build relevance | Connect to networks | Support collaboration | Assess and provide feedback | Guide reflection | Differentiate for diverse learners | Promote empathy

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Give students agency

 

Give students agency

Giving students agency encourages them to share and explore issues of global significance that they would like to learn more about. It encourages them to address problems they would like to solve.

Allow students to design advocacy projects, initiate school-wide campaigns or propose improvement plans for issues affecting local and global communities, such as water conservation or access to education.

For more ideas on how to give students agency, check out our Beginner’s Guide to Project-based Learning.

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Build relevance

 

Build relevance

Connect academic concepts and skills to students’ lives and interests. Help them understand how to compare and contrast information about different regions and people to their own communities and lives.

Relevant learning feels alive and familiar and meets an urgent “need to know” that comes from the learner. They can better make connections between content studied in different academic subjects, and better understand issues in the world.

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Connect to networks beyond the classroom

 

Connect to networks beyond the classroom

Bring the world to your classroom. As global citizens, it’s crucial for our students to be able to navigate and leverage connections to make the world a better place.

Whether we’re connecting with other classrooms across the planet or community organizations down the street, we can build relevance and meaning by breaking down the walls of our classrooms.

Some ideas:

  • Have students communicate with peers in other regions of the world through real-time video chats and/or written correspondence.
  • Plan local or school-based cultural fairs or festivals.
  • Introduce students to the world outside their immediate community through virtual maps, guest speakers, literature, music, and other cultural artifacts.

Here are some more virtual exchange ideas used by ambassador teachers in their classrooms.

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Support collaboration

 

Support collaboration

Design projects so that students learn to work together and see that cooperation can lead to results greater than what one person can do on their own.

They could engage with learning stations, work in pairs or participate in group activities to ask questions, investigate answers and create solutions. Encourage students to take on different roles in a group, each with different responsibilities.

As part of the collaboration, help students reflect on their own and each other’s contributions and give one another constructive feedback on group activities.

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Assess and provide feedback

 

Assess and provide feedback

Offer students guidance on how to improve and grow using a variety of assessments to gauge their comprehension of global content and understanding of competency building.

Measure academics in the context of authentic activities related to a project or topic that the students are invested in, rather than quizzes or worksheets that focus on the skill or knowledge in isolation.

Involve students in measuring global competencies. Unpack the attitudes, skills and knowledge as a class, then empower students to look for those in each other.

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Guide reflection and metacognition

 

Guide reflection and metacognition

Build student reflections into every learning experience and equip students to think critically about how they learn and work best.

We can empower our students as owners of their learning when we give them the time and support to think critically about what they’re learning, why they’re learning it, how they learn best, and how they’ll use what they’re learning in their lives and in the world.

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Differentiate for diverse learners

 

Differentiate for diverse learners

Design learning experiences that work for everyone: learning that enables all students to find meaning, to explore interests and build skills in different ways, and to recognize that diversity makes us stronger as a whole.

Offer tiered activities that account for learning preferences or that foster peer support, and provide access to an array of content-supporting materials that represent various readability levels.

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Promote empathy

 

Promote empathy

Empathetic students put themselves in the shoes of others and reflect on how they would feel in various situations.

Challenge students to be curious about other people’s feelings, to wonder how they would react to different situations and to consider how they can show they care.

Discuss the causes of someone else’s feelings or actions and provide students with opportunities to show they care about other people’s feelings.

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Implementing the instructional practices

Our team of instructional support specialists helps members of the Participate Learning Partnership implement global programs aligned with this global citizenship framework. These programs integrate with existing programs and meet curriculum standards. Get in touch to learn more about how Participate Learning could support your school or district.

Global lens


Global Lens

A core component of our global citizenship framework are the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) which become the lens through which learning occurs in the schools that are members of the Participate Learning Partnership. Our partner schools choose SDGs that align with their own beliefs and initiatives, and use them as a framework for their academics. For instance, if SDG #6, Clean Water and Sanitation, is of particular interest to a school, or to a classroom, teachers incorporate this topic into the lessons. The global lens of the SDG’s empower school leaders, teachers, administrators to educate and engage students to take action and make the world a better place for all.

It is made up of the following six elements coming together:

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Global school culture | Collaborative leadership | Experiential professional learning | Student-centered instruction | Globally integrated curriculum | Connection to larger learning communities

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Intentionally global school culture

 

An intentionally global school culture

The school community incorporates a commitment to global readiness into its guiding philosophy, everyday habits, communication and aesthetics.

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Collaborative leadership

 

Collaborative leadership

School leaders communicate with the community about vision and goals, and equip global committee members and teachers for success.

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Experiential professional learning

 

Experiential professional learning

Teachers are provided with opportunities for action-oriented professional development supporting global education.

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Student-centered instruction

 

Student-centered instruction

Teachers and administrators are purposeful in helping students feel agency in their learning.

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A globally integrated curriculum

 

A globally integrated curriculum

Teachers consistently engage global content, multicultural perspectives, and problem solving across subject areas and grade levels.

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Connections to larger learning communities

 

Connections to larger learning communities

School projects combine knowledge building with meaningful community outreach and service.

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Developing your global lens

Participate Global Schools align their global initiatives with other strategic priorities. This way, the lens of global education serves as the foundation for strategic planning or directly enhances ongoing strategic efforts.

Our team advises and supports partner schools and districts as they develop their own global lens. Get in touch to learn about how Participate Learning could support your global education efforts.

Global competencies framework


Global competencies:

The driving purpose behind global learning is to support young people as they become globally competent citizens. Global competencies are aligned to the Program for International Student Assessment’s (PISA) definition of global competence.

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Self-awareness | Respect for difference | Global connection | Curiosity | Flexibility | Effective communication | Analytical thinking | Empathy | Understanding issues | Intercultural knowledge

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Self awareness

 

Self-awareness

Global citizens reflect on their own actions and attitudes and how those have been shaped over time. They take responsibility for their perspectives and push themselves to learn more about the world.

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Respect for difference

 

Respect for difference

Global citizens value diversity. They seek out multiple perspectives, understanding that they have much to learn from people who have different experiences.

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Sense of global connection

 

Sense of global connection

Global citizens feel a deep connection to the world. They celebrate the interconnectedness of all people and cultures and take responsibility for making the world a better place, working together for a better tomorrow.

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Curiosity

 

Curiosity

Global citizens have a genuine desire to learn about and experience the world. They ask questions and seek answers. They want to know what’s happening beyond their own backyard.

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Flexibility

 

Flexibility

Global citizens adapt to new situations and change course based on new information. They are comfortable with the unknown.

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Effective and appropriate communication

 

Effective and appropriate communication

Global citizens can communicate with lots of different people and navigate cultural norms to make sure that everyone is understood.

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Analytical and critical thinking

 

Analytical and critical thinking

Global citizens look at the world with a critical eye, questioning assumptions and digging below the surface. They draw logical and fair conclusions based on evidence and can explain their thinking.

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Empathy

 

Empathy

Global citizens are able see things from other people’s perspectives. They withhold judgement and try to understand what leads people to act, feel or think certain ways.

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Understanding of global issues

 

Understanding of global issues

Global citizens know what’s going on in the world. They pursue accurate and objective information about issues that impact people all over the world.

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Intercultural knowledge

 

Intercultural knowledge

Global citizens understand that people around the world are different and shaped by different circumstances and cultural influences.

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GC infographic thumbnail

Get this information in an infographic that you can print for your class or hand out to students.

Partner with us

Partner with us to bring global education and dual language programs to your school. We'd love to help you develop the next generation of global citizens.